Parsonage-Turner Syndrome Revisited

This syndrome is due to chronic compression and inflammation and subsequently mastcell infiltration in the plexus. The treatment with palmitoylethanolamide (PeaPure) has helped a number of patients: 1 month 3 times 400 mg, second month 3x2x 400 mg in case of insufficient effect, treatment period 2 months before judgement. Various studies in nerve compression syndromes with PEA were positive. The compound is natural, body own and very safe.

Neurology Update

Posted by Daniel Rubio, Drexel University College of Medicine Class of 2014

Parsonage-Turner Syndrome (PTS) is an inflammatory disorder that affects the brachial plexus an important network of nerves which lies deep in the armpit (axilla) giving off nerve brachnes including the axillary, radial, musculocutaneous, ulnar and median nerves which supply power to the shoulder and entire upper extremity.

What does PTS look like?

Unlike other brachial plexopathies, PTS begins spontaneously, without any prior injury to the arm, neck, or axilla.  The classical presentation is severe pain followed by patchy weakness in the shoulder, biceps, and the muscles controlling the thumb and first two fingers (index and middle).  It may also present with a finding known as winged scapula: the shoulder blade sticks out more from the back especially when pushing yourself off a wall.  Weakness may be so severe that the muscles may actually shrink (atrophy).  Pain may be found…

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